English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Sex or cannibalism: Polyphenism and kin recognition control social action strategies in nematodes

Lightfoot, J. W., Dardiry, M., Kalirad, A., Giaimo, S., Eberhardt, G., Witte, H., et al. (2021). Sex or cannibalism: Polyphenism and kin recognition control social action strategies in nematodes. Science Advances, 7(35): eabg8042. doi:10.1126/sciadv.abg8042.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
sciadv.abg8042.pdf (Publisher version), 552KB
Name:
sciadv.abg8042.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Lightfoot, James W., Author
Dardiry, Mohannad, Author
Kalirad, Ata, Author
Giaimo, Stefano1, Author              
Eberhardt, Gabi, Author
Witte, Hanh, Author
Wilecki, Martin, Author
Rödelsperger, Christian, Author
Traulsen, Arne1, Author              
Sommer, Ralf J., Author
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445641              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Resource polyphenisms, where single genotypes produce alternative feeding strategies in response to changing environments, are thought to be facilitators of evolutionary novelty. However, understanding the interplay between environment, morphology, and behavior and its significance is complex. We explore a radiation of Pristionchus nematodes with discrete polyphenic mouth forms and associated microbivorous versus cannibalistic traits. Notably, comparing 29 Pristionchus species reveals that reproductive mode strongly correlates with mouth-form plasticity. Male-female species exhibit the microbivorous morph and avoid parent-offspring conflict as indicated by genetic hybrids. In contrast, hermaphroditic species display cannibalistic morphs encouraging competition. Testing predation between 36 co-occurring strains of the hermaphrodite P. pacificus showed that killing inversely correlates with genomic relatedness. These empirical data together with theory reveal that polyphenism (plasticity), kin recognition, and relatedness are three major factors that shape cannibalistic behaviors. Thus, developmental plasticity influences cooperative versus competitive social action strategies in diverse animals.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-01-282021-07-012021-08-252021-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abg8042
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Science Advances
  Other : Sci. Adv.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Washington : AAAS
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 7 (35) Sequence Number: eabg8042 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2375-2548
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2375-2548