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  Grey wolf genomic history reveals a dual ancestry of dogs

Bergström, A., Stanton, D. W. G., Taron, U. H., Frantz, L., Sinding, M.-H.-S., Ersmark, E., et al. (2022). Grey wolf genomic history reveals a dual ancestry of dogs. Nature, s41586-022-04824-9. doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04824-9.

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Bergström, Anders, Author
Stanton, David W. G., Author
Taron, Ulrike H., Author
Frantz, Laurent, Author
Sinding, Mikkel-Holger S., Author
Ersmark, Erik, Author
Pfrengle, Saskia, Author
Cassatt-Johnstone, Molly, Author
Lebrasseur, Ophélie, Author
Girdland-Flink, Linus, Author
Fernandes, Daniel M., Author
Ollivier, Morgane, Author
Speidel, Leo, Author
Gopalakrishnan, Shyam, Author
Westbury, Michael V., Author
Ramos-Madrigal, Jazmin, Author
Feuerborn, Tatiana R., Author
Reiter, Ella, Author
Gretzinger, Joscha1, Author           
Münzel, Susanne C., Author
Swali, Pooja, AuthorConard, Nicholas J., AuthorCarøe, Christian, AuthorHaile, James, AuthorLinderholm, Anna, AuthorAndrosov, Semyon, AuthorBarnes, Ian, AuthorBaumann, Chris, AuthorBenecke, Norbert, AuthorBocherens, Hervé, AuthorBrace, Selina, AuthorCarden, Ruth F., AuthorDrucker, Dorothée G., AuthorFedorov, Sergey, AuthorGasparik, Mihály, AuthorGermonpré, Mietje, AuthorGrigoriev, Semyon, AuthorGroves, Pam, AuthorHertwig, Stefan T., AuthorIvanova, Varvara V., AuthorJanssens, Luc, AuthorJennings, Richard P., AuthorKasparov, Aleksei K., AuthorKirillova, Irina V., AuthorKurmaniyazov, Islam, AuthorKuzmin, Yaroslav V., AuthorKosintsev, Pavel A., AuthorLázničková-Galetová, Martina, AuthorLeduc, Charlotte, AuthorNikolskiy, Pavel, AuthorNussbaumer, Marc, AuthorO’Drisceoil, Cóilín, AuthorOrlando, Ludovic, AuthorOutram, Alan, AuthorPavlova, Elena Y., AuthorPerri, Angela R., AuthorPilot, Małgorzata, AuthorPitulko, Vladimir V., AuthorPlotnikov, Valerii V., AuthorProtopopov, Albert V., AuthorRehazek, André, AuthorSablin, Mikhail, AuthorSeguin-Orlando, Andaine, AuthorStorå, Jan, AuthorVerjux, Christian, AuthorZaibert, Victor F., AuthorZazula, Grant, AuthorCrombé, Philippe, AuthorHansen, Anders J., AuthorWillerslev, Eske, AuthorLeonard, Jennifer A., AuthorGötherström, Anders, AuthorPinhasi, Ron, AuthorSchuenemann, Verena J., AuthorHofreiter, Michael, AuthorGilbert, M. Thomas P., AuthorShapiro, Beth, AuthorLarson, Greger, AuthorKrause, Johannes, AuthorDalén, Love, AuthorSkoglund, Pontus, Author more..
Affiliations:
1Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074310              

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Free keywords: Archaeology, Ecological genetics, Evolutionary genetics, Population genetics
 Abstract: The grey wolf (Canis lupus) was the first species to give rise to a domestic population, and they remained widespread throughout the last Ice Age when many other large mammal species went extinct. Little is known, however, about the history and possible extinction of past wolf populations or when and where the wolf progenitors of the present-day dog lineage (Canis familiaris) lived1–8. Here we analysed 72 ancient wolf genomes spanning the last 100,000 years from Europe, Siberia and North America. We found that wolf populations were highly connected throughout the Late Pleistocene, with levels of differentiation an order of magnitude lower than they are today. This population connectivity allowed us to detect natural selection across the time series, including rapid fixation of mutations in the gene IFT88 40,000–30,000 years ago. We show that dogs are overall more closely related to ancient wolves from eastern Eurasia than to those from western Eurasia, suggesting a domestication process in the east. However, we also found that dogs in the Near East and Africa derive up to half of their ancestry from a distinct population related to modern southwest Eurasian wolves, reflecting either an independent domestication process or admixture from local wolves. None of the analysed ancient wolf genomes is a direct match for either of these dog ancestries, meaning that the exact progenitor populations remain to be located.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-06-29
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 22
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Wolf genomes spanning 100,000 years
Siberia as a source of global gene flow
High connectivity in the Pleistocene
Natural selection over 100,000 years
Dog ancestry has eastern wolf affinities
A second source for western dog ancestry
Conclusion
Methods
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41586-022-04824-9
Other: shh3284
 Degree: -

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Title: Nature
  Abbreviation : Nature
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: s41586-022-04824-9 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0028-0836
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925427238