English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Proteogenomics analysis of CUG codon translation in the human pathogen Candida albicans

Mühlhausen, S., Schmitt, H. D., Plessmann, U., Mienkus, P., Sternisek, P., Perl, T., et al. (2021). Proteogenomics analysis of CUG codon translation in the human pathogen Candida albicans. BMC Biology, 19: 258. doi:10.1186/s12915-021-01197-9.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
3395705.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
3395705.pdf
Description:
-
OA-Status:
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Mühlhausen, S., Author
Schmitt, H. D.1, Author           
Plessmann, U.2, Author           
Mienkus, P.1, Author           
Sternisek, P., Author
Perl, T., Author
Weig, M., Author
Urlaub, H.2, Author           
Bader, O., Author
Kollmar, M., Author
Affiliations:
1Laboratory of Neurobiology, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_3049887              
2Research Group of Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578613              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Proteogenomics, Pathogen, Candida albicans, Genetic code
 Abstract: Abstract Background: Yeasts of the CTG-clade lineage, which includes the human-infecting Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis species, are characterized by an altered genetic code. Instead of translating CUG codons as leucine, as happens in most eukaryotes, these yeasts, whose ancestors are thought to have lost the relevant leucine-tRNA gene, translate CUG codons as serine using a serine-tRNA with a mutated anticodon, tRNASer CAG . Previously reported experiments have suggested that 3–5% of the CTG-clade CUG codons are mistranslated as leucine due to mischarging of the tRNA Ser CAG . The mistranslation was suggested to result in variable surface proteins explaining fast host adaptation and pathogenicity. Results: In this study, we reassess this potential mistranslation by high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteogenomics of multiple CTG-clade yeasts, including various C. albicans strains, isolated from colonized and from infected human body sites, and C. albicans grown in yeast and hyphal forms. Our data do not support a bias towards CUG codon mistranslation as leucine. Instead, our data suggest that (i) CUG codons are mistranslated at a frequency corresponding to the normal extent of ribosomal mistranslation with no preference for specific amino acids, (ii) CUG codons are as unambiguous (or ambiguous) as the related CUU leucine and UCC serine codons, (iii) tRNA anticodon loop variation across the CTG-clade yeasts does not result in any difference of the mistranslation level, and (iv) CUG codon unambiguity is independent of C. albicans’ strain pathogenicity or growth form. Conclusions: Our findings imply that C. albicans does not decode CUG ambiguously. This suggests that the proposed misleucylation of the tRNA Ser CAG might be as prevalent as every other misacylation or mistranslation event and, if at all, be just one of many reasons causing phenotypic diversity.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-12-04
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1186/s12915-021-01197-9
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: BMC Biology
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: 15 Volume / Issue: 19 Sequence Number: 258 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1741-7007