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  Detection of transcranial alternating current stimulation aftereffects is improved by considering the individual electric field strength and self-rated sleepiness

Steinmann, I., Williams, K., Wilke, M., & Antal, A. (2022). Detection of transcranial alternating current stimulation aftereffects is improved by considering the individual electric field strength and self-rated sleepiness. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 16: 870758. doi:10.3389/fnins.2022.870758.

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 Creators:
Steinmann, Iris1, Author
Williams, Kathleen1, 2, Author           
Wilke, Melanie1, 3, Author
Antal, Andrea4, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Cognitive Neurology, University Medical Center, Göttingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Lise Meitner Research Group Cognition and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3025665              
3German Primate Center, Göttingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Neurology, University Medical Center, Göttingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Aftereffect; Alpha amplitude; Electrical field strength; Sleepiness; Subject-specific variability; tACS (transcranial alternating current stimulation)
 Abstract: Non-invasive electrical stimulation methods, such as transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), are increasingly used in human neuroscience research and offer potential new avenues to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, their often variable effects have also raised concerns in the scientific and clinical communities. This study aims to investigate the influence of subject-specific factors on the alpha tACS-induced aftereffect on the alpha amplitude (measured with electroencephalography, EEG) as well as on the connectivity strength between nodes of the default mode network (DMN) [measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)]. As subject-specific factors we considered the individual electrical field (EFIELD) strength at target regions in the brain, the frequency mismatch between applied stimulation and individual alpha frequency (IAF) and as a covariate, subject's changes in mental state, i.e., sleepiness. Eighteen subjects participated in a tACS and a sham session conducted on different days. Each session consisted of three runs (pre/stimulation/). tACS was applied during the second run at each subject's individual alpha frequency (IAF), applying 1 mA peak-to-peak intensity for 7 min, using an occipital bihemispheric montage. In every run, subjects watched a video designed to increase in-scanner compliance. To investigate the aftereffect of tACS on EEG alpha amplitude and on DMN connectivity strength, EEG data were recorded simultaneously with fMRI data. Self-rated sleepiness was documented using a questionnaire. Conventional statistics (ANOVA) did not show a significant aftereffect of tACS on the alpha amplitude compared to sham stimulation. Including individual EFIELD strengths and self-rated sleepiness scores in a multiple linear regression model, significant tACS-induced aftereffects were observed. However, the subject-wise mismatch between tACS frequency and IAF had no contribution to our model. Neither standard nor extended statistical methods confirmed a tACS-induced aftereffect on DMN functional connectivity. Our results show that it is possible and necessary to disentangle alpha amplitude changes due to intrinsic mechanisms and to external manipulation using tACS on the alpha amplitude that might otherwise be overlooked. Our results suggest that EFIELD is really the most significant factor that explains the alpha amplitude modulation during a tACS session. This knowledge helps to understand the variability of the tACS-induced aftereffects.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-02-072022-05-042022-06-27
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2022.870758
Other: eCollection 2022
PMID: 35833087
PMC: PMC9272587
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Neuroscience
  Other : Front Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 16 Sequence Number: 870758 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-4548
ISSN: 1662-453X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-4548