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  Expectancy changes the self-monitoring of voice identity

Johnson, J. F., Belyk, M., Schwartze, M., Pinheiro, A. P., & Kotz, S. A. (2021). Expectancy changes the self-monitoring of voice identity. European Journal of Neuroscience, 53(8), 2681-2695. doi:10.1111/ejn.15162.

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 Creators:
Johnson, Joseph F.1, Author
Belyk, Michel2, Author
Schwartze, Michael1, Author
Pinheiro, Ana P.3, Author
Kotz, Sonja A.1, 4, Author           
Affiliations:
1Department of Neuropsychology and Psychopharmacology, Maastricht University, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Faculty of Psychology, University of Lisbon, Portugal, ou_persistent22              
4Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Auditory feedback; FMRI; Motor‐induced suppression; Source attribution; Voice morphing
 Abstract: Self-voice attribution can become difficult when voice characteristics are ambiguous, but functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) investigations of such ambiguity are sparse. We utilized voice-morphing (self-other) to manipulate (un-)certainty in self-voice attribution in a button-press paradigm. This allowed investigating how levels of self-voice certainty alter brain activation in brain regions monitoring voice identity and unexpected changes in voice playback quality. FMRI results confirmed a self-voice suppression effect in the right anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG) when self-voice attribution was unambiguous. Although the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) was more active during a self-generated compared to a passively heard voice, the putative role of this region in detecting unexpected self-voice changes during the action was demonstrated only when hearing the voice of another speaker and not when attribution was uncertain. Further research on the link between right aSTG and IFG is required and may establish a threshold monitoring voice identity in action. The current results have implications for a better understanding of the altered experience of self-voice feedback in auditory verbal hallucinations.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-01-182020-07-212021-02-262021-02-262021-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/ejn.15162
Other: epub 2021
PMID: 33638190
PMC: PMC8252045
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Project name : -
Grant ID : BIAL 238/16
Funding program : -
Funding organization : BIAL Foundation
Project name : -
Grant ID : PTDC/MHC-PCN/0101/2014
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia

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Title: European Journal of Neuroscience
  Other : Eur. J. Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford, UK : Published on behalf of the European Neuroscience Association by Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 53 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2681 - 2695 Identifier: ISSN: 0953-816X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925575988