English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Disrupted network interactions serve as a neural marker of dyslexia

Turker, S., Kuhnke, P., Jiang, Z., & Hartwigsen, G. (2023). Disrupted network interactions serve as a neural marker of dyslexia. Communications Biology, 6(1): 1114. doi:10.1038/s42003-023-05499-2.

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Turker_Kuhnke_2023.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
Name:
Turker_Kuhnke_2023.pdf
Description:
-
OA-Status:
Gold
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
:
Turker_Kuhnke_2023_Suppl.pdf (Supplementary material), 2MB
Name:
Turker_Kuhnke_2023_Suppl.pdf
Description:
-
OA-Status:
Gold
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Turker, Sabrina1, 2, Author                 
Kuhnke, Philipp1, 2, Author                 
Jiang, Zhizhao1, Author
Hartwigsen, Gesa1, 2, Author                 
Affiliations:
1Lise Meitner Research Group Cognition and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3025665              
2Wilhelm Wundt Institute for Psychology, Leipzig University, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Dyslexia; Human behaviour; Reading
 Abstract: Dyslexia, a frequent learning disorder, is characterized by severe impairments in reading and writing and hypoactivation in reading regions in the left hemisphere. Despite decades of research, it remains unclear to date if observed behavioural deficits are caused by aberrant network interactions during reading and whether differences in functional activation and connectivity are directly related to reading performance. Here we provide a comprehensive characterization of reading-related brain connectivity in adults with and without dyslexia. We find disrupted functional coupling between hypoactive reading regions, especially between the left temporo-parietal and occipito-temporal cortices, and an extensive functional disruption of the right cerebellum in adults with dyslexia. Network analyses suggest that individuals with dyslexia process written stimuli via a dorsal decoding route and show stronger reading-related interaction with the right cerebellum. Moreover, increased connectivity within networks is linked to worse reading performance in dyslexia. Collectively, our results provide strong evidence for aberrant task-related connectivity as a neural marker for dyslexia that directly impacts behavioural performance. The observed differences in activation and connectivity suggest that one effective way to alleviate reading problems in dyslexia is through modulating interactions within the reading network with neurostimulation methods.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2023-03-022023-10-242023-11-032023-11-03
 Publication Status: Issued
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s42003-023-05499-2
PMID: 37923809
PMC: PMC10624919
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show hide
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Max Planck Society
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : German Research Foundation (DFG)
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : European Research Council (ERC)
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Projekt DEAL

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Communications Biology
  Abbreviation : Commun. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Springer Nature
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 (1) Sequence Number: 1114 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2399-3642
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2399-3642