English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  A novel method for estimating properties of attentional oscillators reveals an age-related decline in flexibility

Kaya, E., Kotz, S. A., & Henry, M. J. (2024). A novel method for estimating properties of attentional oscillators reveals an age-related decline in flexibility. eLife. doi:10.7554/eLife.90735.2.

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
24-ner-kay-01-novel.pdf (Publisher version), 6MB
Name:
24-ner-kay-01-novel.pdf
Description:
OA
OA-Status:
Gold
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
2024
Copyright Info:
This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Kaya, Ece1, 2, Author                 
Kotz, Sonja A.2, 3, Author
Henry, Molly J.1, 4, Author                 
Affiliations:
1Research Group Neural and Environmental Rhythms, Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, Max Planck Society, ou_3177420              
2Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
3Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Science, Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Toronto Metropolitan University, Toronto, Canada, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Auditory tasks such as understanding speech and listening to music rely on the ability to track sound sequences and adjust attention based on the temporal cues they contain. An entrainment approach proposes that internal oscillatory mechanisms underlie the ability to synchronize with rhythms in the external world. Here, we aimed to understand the factors that facilitate and impede rhythm processing by investigating the interplay between the properties of external and internal rhythms. We focused on two key properties of an oscillator: its preferred rate, the default rate at which it oscillates in the absence of input, and flexibility, its ability to adapt to changes in rhythmic context. We hypothesized that flexibility would be diminished with advancing age. Experiment 1 was a two-session duration discrimination paradigm where we developed methods to estimate preferred rate and flexibility and assessed their reliability. Experiment 2 involved a shorter version of this paradigm and a paced tapping task with matched stimulus conditions, in addition to a spontaneous motor tempo (SMT) and two preferred perceptual tempo (PPT) tasks that measured motor and perceptual rate preferences, respectively. Preferred rates, estimated as the stimulus rates with the best performance, showed a harmonic relationship across sessions (Experiment 1) and were correlated with SMT (Experiment 2). Interestingly, estimates from motor tasks were slower than those from the perceptual task, and the degree of slowing was consistent for each individual. To challenge an individual’s oscillator flexibility, we maximized the differences in stimulus rates between consecutive trials in the duration discrimination and paced tapping tasks. As a result, performance in both tasks decreased, and performance on individual trials indicated a gravitation toward the stimulus rate presented in the preceding trial. Critically, flexibility, quantified as an individual’s ability to adapt to faster-than-previous rates, decreased with age. Overall, these findings show domain-specific rate preferences for the assumed oscillatory system underlying rhythm perception and production, and that this system loses its ability to flexibly adapt to changes in the external rhythmic context during ageing.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2024-03-19
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.7554/eLife.90735.2
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: eLife
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Cambridge : eLife Sciences Publications
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: Other: URL
ISSN: 2050-084X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2050-084X