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  Processing of natural temporal stimuli by macaque retinal ganglion cells

van Hateren, J. H., Ruettiger, L., Sun, H., & Lee, B. B. (2002). Processing of natural temporal stimuli by macaque retinal ganglion cells. Journal of Neuroscience, 22(22), 9945-9960. Retrieved from http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/reprint/22/22/9945.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-F28F-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-E492-F
Genre: Journal Article

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van Hateren, J. H.1, Author
Ruettiger, L.2, Author              
Sun, H., Author
Lee, B. B.3, Author              
Affiliations:

2Department of Membrane Biophysics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578579              
3Abteilung Neurobiologie, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578620              

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Free keywords: retinal ganglion cells; magnocellular; parvocellular; natural stimuli; information theory; macaque
 Abstract: This study quantifies the performance of primate retinal ganglion cells in response to natural stimuli. Stimuli were confined to the temporal and chromatic domains and were derived from two contrasting environments, one typically northern European and the other a flower show. The performance of the cells was evaluated by investigating variability of cell responses to repeated stimulus presentations and by comparing measured to model responses. Both analyses yielded a quantity called the coherence rate (in bits per second), which is related to the information rate. Magnocellular (MC) cells yielded coherence rates of up to 100 bits/sec, rates of parvocellular (PC) cells were much lower, and short wavelength (S)-cone-driven ganglion cells yielded intermediate rates. The modeling approach showed that for MC cells, coherence rates were generated almost exclusively by the luminance content of the stimulus. Coherence rates of PC cells were also dominated by achromatic content. This is a consequence of the stimulus structure; luminance varied much more in the natural environment than chromaticity. Only approximately one-sixth of the coherence rate of the PC cells derived from chromatic content, and it was dominated by frequencies below 10 Hz. S- cone-driven ganglion cells also yielded coherence rates dominated by low frequencies. Below 2-3 Hz, PC cell signals contained more power than those of MC cells. Response variation between individual ganglion cells of a particular class was analyzed by constructing generic cells, the properties of which may be relevant for performance higher in the visual system. The approach used here helps define retinal modules useful for studies of higher visual processing of natural stimuli.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2002-11-15
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
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Title: Journal of Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 22 (22) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 9945 - 9960 Identifier: -