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  Evolution of bacteriophage in continuous culture: a model system to test antiviral gene therapies for the emergence of phage escape mutants

Lindemann, B. F., Klug, C., & Schwienhorst, A. (2002). Evolution of bacteriophage in continuous culture: a model system to test antiviral gene therapies for the emergence of phage escape mutants. Journal of Virology, 76(11), 5784-5792. Retrieved from http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/reprint/76/11/5784.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-F3AD-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-E5B2-E
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Lindemann, B. F.1, Author              
Klug, C., Author
Schwienhorst, A., Author
Affiliations:
1Abteilung Biochemische Kinetik, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578616              

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 Abstract: The emergence of viral escape mutants is usually a highly undesirable phenomenon. This phenomenon is frequently observed in antiviral drug applications for the treatment of viral infections and can undermine long-term therapeutic success. Here, we propose a strategy for evaluating a given antiviral approach in terms of its potential to provoke the appearance of resistant virus mutants. By use of Q(3 RNA phage as a model system, the effect of an antiviral gene therapy, i.e., a virus- specific repressor protein expressed by a recombinant Escherichia coli host, was studied over the course of more than 100 generations. In 13 experiments carried out in parallel, 12 phage populations became resistant and 1 became extinct. Sequence analysis revealed that only two distinct phage mutants emerged in the 12 surviving phage populations. For both escape mutants, sequence variations located in the repressor binding site of the viral genomic RNA, which decrease affinity for the repressor protein, conferred resistance to translational repression. The results clearly suggest the feasibility of the proposed strategy for the evaluation of antiviral approaches in terms of their potential to allow resistant mutants to appear. In addition, the strategy proved to be a valuable tool for observing virus-specific molecular targets under the impact of antiviral drugs.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2002-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: Peer
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Title: Journal of Virology
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 76 (11) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 5784 - 5792 Identifier: -