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  Dominance style in female guerezas (Colobus guereza RUEPPELL 1835)

Grunau, T., & Kuester, J. (2001). Dominance style in female guerezas (Colobus guereza RUEPPELL 1835). Primates, 42(4), 301-307. Retrieved from http://springerlink.metapress.com/content/04t858m2178t2j87/fulltext.pdf.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-F531-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-E361-5
Genre: Journal Article

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16929.pdf (Publisher version), 0B
 
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 Creators:
Grunau, T., Author
Kuester, J.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Neurobiology, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578595              

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Free keywords: Colobus guereza; colobinae; female relations; dominance style; rank relations; egalitarian relationships
 Abstract: Socioecological models assume that quality and distribution of food ultimately determine female social relationships: a high quality diet and clumped food distribution should result in the establishment of a hierarchy with stable rank relations which is supported by empirical studies on frugivorous cercopithecines. By contrast, folivorous species with their low quality diet and dispersed food distribution should have egalitarian social relationships but empirical data are very rare. This study on female guerezas of a zoo group aimed to test the models in a colobine species and the results largely agreed with the predictions of the models: facial expressions, vocalizations, and gestures were not used for signalling dominance or subordination. Unritualized aggressions occurred frequently but were of low intensity, and interventions by third parties were never observed. Aggressions were exchanged bidirectionally and this was true also for food stealing and retreats. All this indicated the lack of established rank relations. Allogrooming was distributed rather equally and showed no kin bias. All these features characterize egalitarian social relationships and, hence, support the socioecological models.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2001-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: Peer
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Title: Primates
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 42 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 301 - 307 Identifier: -