English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Early decreases in alpha and gamma band power distinguish linguistic from visual information during spoken sentence comprehension

Willems, R. M., Oostenveld, R., & Hagoort, P. (2008). Early decreases in alpha and gamma band power distinguish linguistic from visual information during spoken sentence comprehension. Brain Research, 1219, 78-90. doi:10.1016/j.brainres.2008.04.065.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-1F46-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-5876-2
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Willems_2008_early.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
Willems_2008_early.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Willems, Roel M.1, Author              
Oostenveld, Robert2, 3, Author              
Hagoort, Peter1, 2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1FC Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, external, ou_55235              
2Neurobiology of Language Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, Nijmegen, NL, ou_102880              
3Unification, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, ou_55219              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Language is often perceived together with visual information. This raises the question on how the brain integrates information conveyed in visual and/or linguistic format during spoken language comprehension. In this study we investigated the dynamics of semantic integration of visual and linguistic information by means of time-frequency analysis of the EEG signal. A modified version of the N400 paradigm with either a word or a picture of an object being semantically incongruous with respect to the preceding sentence context was employed. Event-Related Potential (ERP) analysis showed qualitatively similar N400 effects for integration of either word or picture. Time-frequency analysis revealed early specific decreases in alpha and gamma band power for linguistic and visual information respectively. We argue that these reflect a rapid context-based analysis of acoustic (word) or visual (picture) form information. We conclude that although full semantic integration of linguistic and visual information occurs through a common mechanism, early differences in oscillations in specific frequency bands reflect the format of the incoming information and, importantly, an early context-based detection of its congruity with respect to the preceding language context

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2008
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: eDoc: 391607
DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2008.04.065
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Brain Research
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 1219 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 78 - 90 Identifier: -