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  Adaptation to tempo change in basal ganglia patients: Tapping evidence

Schwartze, M., Keller, P. E., Patel, A. D., & Kotz, S. A. (2008). Adaptation to tempo change in basal ganglia patients: Tapping evidence. Poster presented at THE NEUROSCIENCES AND MUSIC – III Disorders and plasticity, MONTREAL, McGill University.

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 Creators:
Schwartze, Michael1, Author           
Keller, Peter E.2, 3, Author           
Patel, Aniruddh D., Author
Kotz, Sonja A.1, 4, Author           
Affiliations:
1Minerva Research Group Neurocognition of Rhythm in Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634560              
2Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
3Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              
4Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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 Abstract: The ability to process temporal relations in sensory input is a prerequisite for adequate coordination of behavioral responses and environmental events. Here, sensorimotor synchronization was investigated in an adaptive timing task (Repp & Keller 2004). Patients with basal ganglia (BG) lesions and healthy controls were asked to align finger tapping to tone sequences that either did or did not contain a tempo change. At the end of each sequence participants continued tapping at the final tempo. The initial inter-onset interval (IOI) was 600 ms, followed by tempo accelerations or decelerations of 30, 45, 60 or 75 ms, respectively. Also, each participant´s spontaneous motor tempo (SMT) was assessed before and after the task (McAuley et al. 2006). Results indicate that SMT before the task was more variable in patients than in controls. Both groups showed less variability after the adaptive timing task. During sensorimotor synchronization overall adaption to tempo changes was greater at faster tempi than at slower tempi. Error correction mechanisms, that is, phase- and period correction, were affected differently with phase correction being more effective in tempo decelerations whereas period correction was more effective in tempo accelerations. Especially for slower tempi patients responded more variable and less sensitive to tempo change. The data show that the BG are involved in the detection of tempo change, in particular at slower rates.

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Language(s): eng - English
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 Publication Status: Not specified
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 391840
Other: R3626
 Degree: -

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Title: THE NEUROSCIENCES AND MUSIC – III Disorders and plasticity
Place of Event: MONTREAL, McGill University
Start-/End Date: 2008-06-26 - 2008-06-28

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