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  Aktivitätsmuster im Gehirn: Unterschiede und Gemeinsamkeiten beim Verstehen von Erst- und Zweitsprache

Mueller, J. L., Rüschemeyer, S.-A., & Friederici, A. D. (2006). Aktivitätsmuster im Gehirn: Unterschiede und Gemeinsamkeiten beim Verstehen von Erst- und Zweitsprache. Neuroforum, 2, 176-184.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-9B91-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-19AB-1
Genre: Journal Article
Alternative Title : Cerebral activation patterns: Differences and similarities between native and non-native language comprehension

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mueller_aktivitaetsmuster.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
 
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 Creators:
Mueller, Jutta L.1, Author              
Rüschemeyer, Shirley-Ann1, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Language; fMRI; ERP
 Abstract: Patterns of brain activity: Similarities and differences in first and second language comprehension. The capability to understand and use language is a uniquely human skill, the specific neural mechanisms of which remain largely elusive. In the past decade neuropsychologists and linguists have worked together to try to unravel some of the mysteries surrounding every day language processing. It has been shown with the help of neurophysiological measurements that the processing of language is broken down by the brain into linguistically relevant subcomponents (such as processing of grammati - cal structure or conceptual information). In the first part of this article we report on what neurophysiological research can tell us about how language is processed by the human brain. In the second part of the article we diverge to look at language processing in non-native speakers of a language. Specifically late learners of a second language provide an interesting background for looking at the plasticity of the human brain. Neurophysiological studies on non-native language processing are introduced and the results are discussed in the context of life long learning and development.

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Language(s): deu - German
 Dates: 2006
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: eDoc: 286028
Other: P7244
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Title: Neuroforum
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 2 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 176 - 184 Identifier: ISSN: 0947-0875
CoNE: /journals/resource/110978984249776