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  A Simon-effect with stationary moving stimuli

Bosbach, S., Prinz, W., & Kerzel, D. (2004). A Simon-effect with stationary moving stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 30(1), 39-55. doi:10.1037/0096-1523.30.1.39.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-9E13-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-5BE6-5
Genre: Journal Article

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Bosbach, Simone1, Author              
Prinz, Wolfgang1, Author              
Kerzel, Dirk2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2Research Group Infant Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634562              

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 Abstract: To clarify whether motion information per se has a separable influence on action control, the authors investigated whether irrelevant direction of motion of stimuli whose overall position was constant over time would affect manual left-right responses (i.e., reveal a motion-based Simon effect). In Experiments 1 and 2, significant Simon effects were obtained for sine-wave gratings moving in a stationary Gaussian window. In Experiment 3, a direction-based Simon effect with random-dot patterns was replicated, except that the perceived direction of motion was based on the displacement of single elements. Experiments 4 and 5 studied motion-based Simon effects to point-light figures that walked in place--displays requiring high-level analysis of global shape and local motion. Motion-based Simon effects occurred when the displays could be interpreted as an upright human walker, showing that a high-level representation of motion direction mediated the effects. Thus, the present study establishes links between high-level motion perception and action.

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 Dates: 2004
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 511075
Other: P5235
DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.30.1.39
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Title: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington : American Psychological Association (PsycARTICLES)
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 30 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 39 - 55 Identifier: ISSN: 0096-1523
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954927546243