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  Finding needles in haystacks: Symbolic resonance analysis of event-related potentials unveils different processing demands

Frisch, S., & beim Graben, P. (2005). Finding needles in haystacks: Symbolic resonance analysis of event-related potentials unveils different processing demands. Cognitive Brain Research, 24(3), 476-491. doi:10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.03.004.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-B46D-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-5BF5-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Frisch, Stefan1, Author              
beim Graben, Peter, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Neural basis of behavior, Cognition; Event-related brain potential; Language processing; Argument structure; Symbolic dynamics; Stochastic resonance
 Abstract: Previous ERP studies have found an N400–P600 pattern in sentences in which the number of arguments does not match the number of arguments that the verb can take. In the present study, we elaborate on this question by investigating whether the case of the mismatching object argument in German (accusative/direct object versus dative/indirect object) affects processing differently. In general, both types of mismatches elicited a biphasic N400–P600 response in the ERP. However, traditional voltage average analysis was unable to reveal differences between the two mismatching conditions, that is, between a mismatching accusative versus dative. Therefore, we employed a recently developed method on ERP data analysis, the symbolic resonance analysis (SRA), where EEG epochs are symbolically encoded in sequences of three symbols depending on a given parameter, the encoding threshold. We found a larger proportion of threshold crossing events with negative polarity in the N400 time window for a mismatching dative argument compared to a mismatching accusative argument. By contrast, the proportion of threshold crossing events with positive polarity was smaller for dative in the P600 time window. We argue that this difference is due to the phenomenon of “free dative” in German. This result also shows that the SRA provides a useful tool for revealing ERP differences that cannot be discovered using the traditional voltage average analysis.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2005
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 238073
Other: P6517
DOI: 10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.03.004
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Title: Cognitive Brain Research
  Other : Cognit. Brain Res.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 24 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 476 - 491 Identifier: ISSN: 0926-6410
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925385137_2