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  Impaired self-initiated task preparation during task switching in Parkinson's disease

Werheid, K., Koch, I., Reichert, K., & Brass, M. (2007). Impaired self-initiated task preparation during task switching in Parkinson's disease. Neuropsychologia, 45(2), 273-281. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2006.07.007.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-BBD5-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-29F2-D
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Werheid, K.1, Author              
Koch, Iring2, Author              
Reichert, Karin, Author
Brass, Marcel3, Author              
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              
2Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
3Department Cognitive Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634563              

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Free keywords: Parkinson's disease; Task switching; Action control; Sequential predictability
 Abstract: Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) typically show reduced performance in clinical tests involving cognitive control processes, presumably due to reduced availability of dopamine in striatofrontal neuronal circuits. Although task switching paradigms are considered as an ideal experimental measure of cognitive control, previous studies on task switching in PD have yielded ambiguous results, indicating that performance deficits depend on the specific task requirements. Among these, the aspect of self-initiated as opposed to externally triggered task preparation seems to play an important role, as evidenced by recent research. To address this topic, the present study investigated PD patients and age-matched controls (n=16) with a sequential switching task in which the upcoming task was predicted by two different types of cues. Firstly, every task was predicted by an external visual cue of varying utility (long versus short precuing interval). Additionally, the tasks were predictable on the basis of a fixed task sequence (AABB), which placed relatively higher demands on self-initiated task preparation. After considerable practice, the sequence was changed to random. Increased reaction times following sequence removal indicated prior use of the sequence in both groups. However, in contrast to healthy age-matched controls, PD patients did not learn to use the predictable task sequence to a greater extent when the utility of the visual task cue was low due to a short precuing interval. This finding is interpreted as evidence for a specific impairment in self-initiated as opposed to externally triggered task preparation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2007
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 345843
Other: P7296
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2006.07.007
 Degree: -

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Title: Neuropsychologia
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Oxford : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 45 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 273 - 281 Identifier: ISSN: 0028-3932
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925428258