English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Intention-based and stimulus-based mechanisms in action selection

Waszak, F., Wascher, E., Keller, P. E., Koch, I., Aschersleben, G., Rosenbaum, D. A., et al. (2005). Intention-based and stimulus-based mechanisms in action selection. Experimental Brain Research, 162(3), 346-356. doi:10.1007/s00221-004-2183-8.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-BE43-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-802E-2
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Waszak, Florian1, Author              
Wascher, Edmund2, Author              
Keller, Peter E.1, Author              
Koch, Iring1, Author              
Aschersleben, Gisa3, Author              
Rosenbaum, David A., Author
Prinz, Wolfgang1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2Max Planck Research Group Cognitive Psychophysiology of Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634565              
3Research Group Infant Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634562              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Action; Reaction; Event-related potential; Readiness potential; P300 component
 Abstract: Human actions can be classified as being either more stimulus-based or more intention-based. According to the ideomotor framework of action control, intention-based actions primarily refer to anticipated action effects (in other words response-stimulus [R-S] bindings), whereas stimulus-based actions are commonly assumed to be more strongly determined by stimulus-response [S-R] bindings. We explored differences in the functional signatures of both modes of action control in a temporal bisection task. Participants either performed a choice response by pressing one out of two keys in response to a preceding stimulus (stimulus-based action), or pressed one out of two keys to produce the next stimulus (intention-based action). In line with the ideomotor framework, we found intention-based actions to be shifted in time towards their anticipated effects (the next stimulus), whereas stimulus-based actions were shifted towards their preceding stimulus. Event-related potentials (ERPs) in the EEG revealed marked differences in action preparation for the two tasks. The data as a whole provide converging evidence for functional differences in the selection of motor actions as a function of their triggering conditions, and support the notion of two different modes of action selection, one being exogenous or mainly stimulus-driven, the other being endogenous or mainly intention-driven.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2005
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 277948
Other: P5822
DOI: 10.1007/s00221-004-2183-8
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Experimental Brain Research
  Other : Exp. Brain Res.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Heidelberg : Springer-Verlag
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 162 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 346 - 356 Identifier: ISSN: 0014-4819
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925398496