English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  On incremental interpretation: Degrees of meaning accessed during sentence comprehension

Schlesewsky, M., & Bornkessel, I. (2004). On incremental interpretation: Degrees of meaning accessed during sentence comprehension. Lingua, 114(9-10), 1213-1234. doi:10.1016/j.lingua.2003.07.006.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-CDF3-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-287B-5
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
schlesewsky.pdf (Publisher version), 450KB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
schlesewsky.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Restricted (Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig; )
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
eDoc_access: INSTITUT
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Schlesewsky, Matthias, Author
Bornkessel, Ina1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Argument Dependency Model; Thematic hierarchy; Morphological case; Language architecture; Language comprehension; Event-related brain potentials
 Abstract: One of the most basic assumptions regarding language comprehension is that it proceeds incrementally, i.e. by seeking to maximise the degree of interpretation computed with each new word that is encountered. This perspective has often been though to entail that the thematic interpretation of an argument may be derived from its grammatical function, for example, via a preference-strategy associating a subject with a Causer. In the present paper, we argue that these conclusions are not supported by experimental findings. Rather, as we show on the basis of a number of studies using event-related brain potentials (ERPs), the degree of meaning derived from a given sentence fragment (form) during online sentence comprehension differs as a function of the morphological informativeness of the sentential arguments. Finally, we present a new model of sentence comprehension, the Argument Dependency Model (ADM), which is designed to capture these differences in the way that meaning is computed incrementally. Specifically, the ADM assumes that argument processing proceeds via two alternative processing pathways, one of which is syntactic, and the other of which is thematic (interpretive) in nature. Whereas both pathways seek to establish hierarchical relations between arguments, only the thematic pathway allows for incremental interpretation to be maximised. Which of the two pathways is chosen during the comprehension of a given sentence crucially depends on the morphological informativeness (i.e. presence or absence of unambiguous morphological case marking) of the arguments. Consequences for language architecture arising from this model will be discussed.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2004
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 239700
Other: P7077
DOI: 10.1016/j.lingua.2003.07.006
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Lingua
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 114 (9-10) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1213 - 1234 Identifier: ISSN: 0024-3841
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925421093