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  On the cost of syntactic ambiguity in human language comprehension: An individual differences approach

Bornkessel, I., Fiebach, C. J., & Friederici, A. D. (2004). On the cost of syntactic ambiguity in human language comprehension: An individual differences approach. Cognitive Brain Research, 21(1), 11-21. doi:10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2004.05.007.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-CE23-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-CF20-1
Genre: Journal Article

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bornkessel.pdf (Publisher version), 286KB
 
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 Creators:
Bornkessel, Ina1, Author              
Fiebach, Christian J.1, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Neural basis of behavior; Cognition; Sentence processing; ERPs; Reading span; Syntactic ambiguity; Inhibition
 Abstract: We present an event-related brain potential (ERP) study demonstrating that high and low span readers show qualitatively different brain responses in the comprehension of ambiguous and complex linguistic stimuli. During the processing of ambiguous German sentences, low span readers showed a broadly distributed, sustained positivity, whereas high span participants showed a shorter, topographically more focused negativity. Qualitatively similar effects were observable in response to (complex) object-initial sentences. Additionally, a neural effect reflecting reanalysis in sentences disambiguated in a dispreferred way (P600) was observable only for high span readers, while the low span group showed an N400-like response. These neurophysiological findings support the notion that individual working memory capacity as measured by the reading span test influences sentence processing mechanisms and are compatible with the hypothesis that low span readers cannot effectively inhibit dispreferred readings.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2004
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 239315
Other: P6792
DOI: 10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2004.05.007
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Title: Cognitive Brain Research
  Other : Cognit. Brain Res.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 21 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 11 - 21 Identifier: ISSN: 0926-6410
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925385137_2