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  Processing lexical semantic and syntactic information in first and second language: fMRI evidence from German and Russian

Rüschemeyer, S.-A., Fiebach, C. J., Kempe, V., & Friederici, A. D. (2005). Processing lexical semantic and syntactic information in first and second language: fMRI evidence from German and Russian. Human Brain Mapping, 25(2), 266-286. doi:10.1002/hbm.20098.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-D268-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-2895-9
Genre: Journal Article

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ruesch_processing.pdf (Publisher version), 434KB
 
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 Creators:
Rüschemeyer, Shirley-Ann1, Author              
Fiebach, Christian J.1, Author              
Kempe, Vera, Author
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Lexical semantic information; Syntactic information; fMRI; Inferior frontal gyrus; Superior temporal gyrus; Basal ganglia
 Abstract: We introduce two experiments that explored syntactic and semantic processing of spoken sentences by native and non-native speakers. In the first experiment, the neural substrates corresponding to detection of syntactic and semantic violations were determined in native speakers of two typologically different languages using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The results show that the underlying neural response of participants to stimuli across different native languages is quite similar. In the second experiment, we investigated how non-native speakers of a language process the same stimuli presented in the first experiment. First, the results show a more similar pattern of increased activation between native and non-native speakers in response to semantic violations than to syntactic violations. Second, the non-native speakers were observed to employ specific portions of the frontotemporal language network differently from those employed by native speakers. These regions included the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), superior temporal gyrus (STG), and subcortical structures of the basal ganglia.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2005
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 239027
Other: P6582
DOI: 10.1002/hbm.20098
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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 25 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 266 - 286 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925601686