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  Segregating semantic and syntactic aspects of processing in the human brain: an fMRI investigation of different word types

Friederici, A. D., Opitz, B., & von Cramon, D. Y. (2000). Segregating semantic and syntactic aspects of processing in the human brain: an fMRI investigation of different word types. Cerebral Cortex, 10(7), 698-705. doi:10.1093/cercor/10.7.698.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-D753-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-1842-2
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Opitz, Bertram1, Author              
von Cramon, D. Yves1, Author              
Affiliations:
1MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634574              

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 Abstract: The processing of single words that varied in their semantic (concrete/abstract word) and syntactic (content/function word) status was investigated under different task demands (semantic/ syntactic task) in an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Task demands to a large degree determined which subparts of the neuronal network supporting word processing were activated. Semantic task demands selectively activated the left pars triangularis of the inferior frontal gyrus (BA 45) and the posterior part of the left middle/superior temporal gyrus (BA 21/22/37). In contrast, syntactic processing requirements led to an increased activation in the inferior tip of the left frontal operculum (BA 44) and the cortex lining the junction of the inferior frontal and inferior precentral sulcus (BA 44/6). Moreover, for these latter areas a word class by concreteness interaction was observed when a syntactic judgement was required. This interaction can be interpreted as a prototypicality effect: non-prototypical members of a word class, i.e. concrete function words and abstract content words, showed a larger activation than prototypical members, i.e. abstract function words and concrete content words. The combined data suggest that the activation pattern underlying word processing is predicted neither by syntactic class nor semantic concreteness but, rather, by task demands focusing either on semantic or syntactic aspects. Thus, our findings that semantic and syntactic aspects of processing are both functionally distinct and involve different subparts of the neuronal network underlying word processing support a domain-specific organization of the language system.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2000
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 239166
ISI: 000088142400006
Other: P6714
DOI: 10.1093/cercor/10.7.698
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Title: Cerebral Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (7) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 698 - 705 Identifier: ISSN: 1047-3211
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925592440