English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Sequence learning in Parkinson's disease: The effect of spatial stimulus-response compatibility

Werheid, K., Zießler, M., Nattkemper, D., & von Cramon, D. Y. (2003). Sequence learning in Parkinson's disease: The effect of spatial stimulus-response compatibility. Brain and Cognition, 52(2), 239-249. doi:10.1016/S0278-2626(03)00076-9.

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
werheid_sequencelearning.pdf (Publisher version), 232KB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
werheid_sequencelearning.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Restricted (Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, MLNP; )
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
eDoc_access: INSTITUT
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Werheid, K.1, Author              
Zießler, Michael, Author
Nattkemper, Dieter2, Author              
von Cramon, D. Yves3, Author              
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              
2MPI for Psychological Research (Munich, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634573              
3MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634574              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Procedural learning; Attention; Serial reaction time task
 Abstract: Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have repeatedly demonstrated reduced sequence-specific learning effects in serial reaction time tasks (SRTs). Previous research with PD patients has mainly employed the 'classical' SRT task, involving a spatially compatible assignment of stimuli and responses. From cognitive research, it is known that spatial compatibility triggers rapid, automatic responses in the direction of the stimulus. Automatic responding has shown to be disinhibited in PD patients and may therefore interfere with stimulus anticipation during the learning process. The aim of the present study was to test this hypothesis by investigating if reduced sequence-specific learning depends on spatial stimulus-response compatibility. PD patients and age-matched controls were examined either with an SRT variant involving central stimulus presentation, thereby preventing automatic linking of stimulus and response locations, or with a spatially compatible SRT task. Patients showed reduced sequence-specific learning effects only when the stimulus-response assignment was spatially compatible. This pattern of results confirms the hypothesis that sequence learning deficits in PD may result from a predominance of automatic response activation over learning-based stimulus anticipations during the learning phase.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2003
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 239633
Other: P7020
DOI: 10.1016/S0278-2626(03)00076-9
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Brain and Cognition
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Orlando, Fla. : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 52 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 239 - 249 Identifier: ISSN: 0278-2626
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922648105