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  The discrimination of angry and fearful facial expressions in 7-month-old infants: An event-related potential study

Kobiella, A., Grossmann, T., Reid, V. M., & Striano, T. (2008). The discrimination of angry and fearful facial expressions in 7-month-old infants: An event-related potential study. Cognition & Emotion, 22(1), 134-146. doi:10.1080/02699930701394256.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-E01B-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-D771-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kobiella, Andrea, Author
Grossmann, Tobias1, Author              
Reid, Vincent M.2, Author              
Striano, Tricia2, Author              
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1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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 Abstract: The important ability to discriminate facial expressions of emotion develops early in human ontogeny. In the present study, 7-month-old infants’ event-related potentials (ERPs) in response to angry and fearful emotional expressions were measured. The angry face evoked a larger negative component (Nc) at fronto-central leads between 300 and 600 ms after stimulus onset when compared to the amplitude of the Nc to the fearful face. Furthermore, over posterior channels, the angry expression elicited a N290 that was larger in amplitude and a P400 that was smaller in amplitude than for the fearful expression. This is the first study that shows that the ability of infants to discriminate angry and fearful facial expressions can be measured at the electrophysiological level. These data suggest that 7-month-olds allocated more attentional resources to the angry face as indexed by the Nc. Implications of this result may be that the social signal values were perceived differentially, not merely as “negative”. Furthermore, it is possible that the angry expression might have been more arousing and discomforting for the infant compared with the fearful expression.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2008
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 418529
DOI: 10.1080/02699930701394256
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Title: Cognition & Emotion
  Other : Cogn. Emot.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Taylor & Francis
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 22 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 134 - 146 Identifier: ISSN: 0269-9931
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925255151