English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The perception of musical phrase structure: A cross-cultural ERP study

Nan, Y., Knösche, T. R., & Friederici, A. D. (2006). The perception of musical phrase structure: A cross-cultural ERP study. Brain Research, 1094(1), 179-191. doi:10.1016/j.brainres.2006.03.115.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-E29E-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-5F99-A
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
nan_perception.pdf (Any fulltext), 812KB
Name:
nan_perception.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Nan, Yun1, Author              
Knösche, Thomas R.1, 2, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Methods and Development Unit MEG and EEG: Signal Analysis and Modelling, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634559              
2Methods and Development Unit Cortical Networks and Cognitive Functions, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634557              
3Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Music perception; Phrase structure; Cultural difference; Event-related potential
 Abstract: Electroencephalography (EEG) was used in a cross-cultural music study investigating phrase boundary perception. Chinese and German musicians performed a cultural categorization task under Chinese and Western music listening conditions. Western music was the major subject for both groups of musicians, while Chinese music was familiar to Chinese subjects only. By manipulating the presence of pauses between two phrases in the biphrasal melodies, EEG correlates for the perception of phrase boundaries were found in both groups under both music listening conditions. Between 450 and 600 ms, the music CPS (closure positive shift), which had been found in earlier studies with a false tone detection task, was replicated for the more global categorization task and for all combinations of subject group and musical style. At short latencies (100 and 450 ms post phrase boundary offset), EEG correlates varied as a function of musical styles and subject group. Both bottom–up (style properties of the music) and top–down (acculturation of the subjects) information interacted during this early processing stage.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2006
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 286022
Other: P7242
DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2006.03.115
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Brain Research
  Other : Brain Res.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 1094 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 179 - 191 Identifier: ISSN: 0006-8993
CoNE: /journals/resource/954926250616