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  Three-dimensional reconstruction of the rat brain cortical microcirculation in vivo

Dirnagl, U., Villringer, A., Gebhardt, R., Haberl, R. L., Schmiedek, P., & Einhaeupl, K. M. (1991). Three-dimensional reconstruction of the rat brain cortical microcirculation in vivo. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism, 11(3), 353-360. doi:10.1038/jcbfm.1991.74.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-E4DD-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-D56B-6
Genre: Journal Article

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Dirnagl, U., Author
Villringer, Arno1, Author              
Gebhardt, R., Author
Haberl, R. L., Author
Schmiedek, P., Author
Einhaeupl, K. M., Author
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1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Cerebral microcirculation; Confocal laser scanning microscopy; Cranial window; Fluorescein angiography; Optical sectioning
 Abstract: We used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to investigate the morphology and three-dimensional relationships of the microcirculation of the superficial layers of the rat brain cortex in vivo. In anesthetized rats equipped with a closed cranial window (dura mater removed), after i.v. injection of 3 mg/100 g of body weight of fluorescein in 0.5 ml of saline, serial optical sections of the brain cortex intraparenchymal microcirculation were taken. Excitation was at a wavelength of 488 nm (argon laser), and emission was collected above 515 nm. CLSM provided images of brain vessels with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio for three-dimensional reconstructions down to a depth of 250 μm beneath the surface of the brain. Compared to conventional fluorescence microscopy, CLSM has a much higher axial resolution and higher depth of penetration. Laser light-induced intravascular aggregates, irregularities of erythrocyte flow, or microvascular occlusions (“light and dye injury”) were not apparent in the current experimental paradigm. CLSM is a promising new tool for in vivo visualization of the cerebral microcirculation. Future studies have to characterize the potential damage to the tissue caused by the cranial window preparation and light and dye mechanisms.

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 Dates: 1991-05-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 510931
Other: P9161
DOI: 10.1038/jcbfm.1991.74
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Title: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 353 - 360 Identifier: -