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  Timing speech: A review of lesion and neuroimaging findings

Schirmer, A. (2004). Timing speech: A review of lesion and neuroimaging findings. Cognitive Brain Research, 21(2), 269-287. doi:10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2004.04.003.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-E51F-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-5A4B-D
Genre: Journal Article

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schirmer_timing.pdf (Publisher version), 334KB
 
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 Creators:
Schirmer, Annett1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Neural basis of behavior, Cognition; Prosody; Duration; Tempo; VOT; CLT; Lateralization; Basal ganglia; Cerebellum
 Abstract: Time is a fundamental dimension of behavior and as such underlies the perception and production of speech. This paper reviews patient and neuroimaging studies that investigated brain structures that support temporal aspects of speech. The left-frontal cortex, the basal ganglia, and the cerebellum represent structures that have been implicated repeatedly. A comparison with the structures involved in the timing of non-speech events (e.g., tones, lights, finger movements) suggests both commonalities and differences: while the basal ganglia and the cerebellum contribute to the timing of speech and non-speech events, the contribution of left-frontal cortex seems to be specific to speech or rapidly changing acoustic information. Motivated by these commonalities and differences, this paper presents assumptions about the function of basal ganglia, cerebellum, and cortex in the timing of speech.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2004
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 239560
DOI: 10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2004.04.003
Other: P6974
 Degree: -

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Title: Cognitive Brain Research
  Other : Cognit. Brain Res.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 21 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 269 - 287 Identifier: ISSN: 0926-6410
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925385137_2