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  What have Klingon letters and faces in common? An fMRI study on content-specific working memory systems

Mecklinger, A., Bosch, V., Grünewald, C., Bentin, S., & von Cramon, D. Y. (2000). What have Klingon letters and faces in common? An fMRI study on content-specific working memory systems. Human Brain Mapping, 11(3), 146-161. doi:10.1002/1097-0193(200011)11:3<146:AID-HBM20>3.0.CO;2-D.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-EA84-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-7DFE-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Mecklinger, Axel1, Author              
Bosch, Volker1, Author              
Grünewald, Christin1, Author              
Bentin, Shlomo, Author
von Cramon, D. Yves1, Author              
Affiliations:
1MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634574              

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 Abstract: Neuroimaging studies show that prefrontal, premotor, and parietal cortical regions are part of a working memory network that supports the active retention of information. In two experiments we used fMRI to examine whether prefrontal and posterior cortical areas are organized in a content-specific way for object and spatial working memory. Subjects performed a delayed matching-to-sample task modified to allow the examination of content-specific retention processes, independent of perceptual and decision-related processes. In Experiment 1, either unfamiliar geometrical objects (Klingon letters from an artificial alphabet unknown to the participants) or their spatial locations had to be memorized, whereas in Experiment 2, either unfamiliar faces or biological objects (butterflies) were actively memorized. All tasks activated a similar cortical network including posterior parietal (banks of the intraparietal sulcus), premotor (banks of the inferior precentral sulcus) and prefrontal regions (banks of the inferior frontal sulcus), and the presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA). For geometrical objects and faces for which strategic semantic processing can be assumed, this activation was larger in the left than in the right hemisphere, whereas a bilateral or right dominant distribution was obtained for butterflies and spatial locations. The present results do not support the process-specific or content-specific view of the role of the prefrontal cortex in working memory task. Rather, they suggest that the inferior prefrontal cortex houses nonmemonic strategic processing systems required for response selection and task management that can flexibly be used across a variety of tasks and informational domains.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2000
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 238986
ISI: 000165145700002
Other: P6546
DOI: 10.1002/1097-0193(200011)11:3<146::AID-HBM20>3.0.CO;2-D
 Degree: -

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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 146 - 161 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925601686