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  Who did what to whom? The neural basis of argument hierarchies during language comprehension

Bornkessel, I., Zysset, S., Friederici, A. D., von Cramon, D. Y., & Schlesewsky, M. (2005). Who did what to whom? The neural basis of argument hierarchies during language comprehension. NeuroImage, 26(1), 221-223. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2005.01.032.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-EB52-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-1F5D-C
Genre: Journal Article

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bornkessel_who did what to whom.pdf (Publisher version), 301KB
 
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 Creators:
Bornkessel, Ina1, Author              
Zysset, Stefan2, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.3, Author              
von Cramon, D. Yves2, Author              
Schlesewsky, Matthias, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neurotypology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634568              
2Department Cognitive Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634563              
3Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Language comprehension; Syntax–semantics interface; Argument hierarchies; Semantic roles; Linearization; Inferior frontal gyrus; Superior temporal sulcus
 Abstract: The present fMRI study aimed at identifying neural correlates of the syntax–semantics interface in language comprehension. This was achieved by examining what we refer to as “argument hierarchy construction”, i.e., determining which participant in a sentence is the “Actor” and which is the “Undergoer” of the event expressed by the verb. In order to identify the neural bases of argument hierarchy processing, we manipulated three factors known to influence the complexity of argument hierarchy construction in German, namely argument order, verb class and morphological ambiguity. Increased argument hierarchization demands engendered enhanced activation in a network of inferior frontal, posterior superior temporal, premotor and parietal areas. Moreover, components of this network were differentially modulated by the individual factors. In particular, the left posterior superior temporal sulcus showed an enhanced sensitivity for morphological information and the syntactic realization of the verb-based argument hierarchy, while the activation of the left inferior frontal gyrus (pars opercularis) corresponded to linearization demands and was independent of morphological information. We therefore argue that, for German, posterior superior temporal and inferior frontal regions engage in the extraction of actorhood from morphosyntactic structure and in the sequential realization of hierarchical interpretive dependencies, respectively.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2005
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 239430
Other: P6885
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2005.01.032
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 26 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 221 - 223 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: /journals/resource/954922650166