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  Why you think Milan is larger than Modena: Neural correlates of the recognition heuristic

Volz, K. G., Schooler, L. J., Schubotz, R. I., Raab, M., Gigerenzer, G., & von Cramon, D. Y. (2006). Why you think Milan is larger than Modena: Neural correlates of the recognition heuristic. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 18(11), 1924-1936. doi:10.1162/jocn.2006.18.11.1924.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-EB8C-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-7C5A-E
Genre: Journal Article

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Volz, Kirsten G.1, Author              
Schooler, L. J., Author
Schubotz, Ricarda Ines1, Author              
Raab, Markus, Author
Gigerenzer, Gerd2, Author              
von Cramon, D. Yves1, Author              
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1Department Cognitive Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634563              
2External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: When ranking two alternatives by some criteria and only one of the alternatives is recognized, participants overwhelmingly adopt the strategy, termed the recognition heuristic (RH), of choosing the recognized alternative. Understanding the neural correlates underlying decisions that follow the RH could help determine whether people make judgments about the RH's applicability or simply choose the recognized alternative. We measured brain activity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging while participants indicated which of two cities they thought was larger (Experiment 1) or which city they recognized (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, increased activation was observed within the anterior frontomedian cortex (aFMC), precuneus, and retrosplenial cortex when participants followed the RH compared to when they did not. Experiment 2 revealed that RH decisional processes cannot be reduced to recognition memory processes. As the aFMC has previously been associated with self-referential judgments, we conclude that RH decisional processes involve an assessment about the applicability of the RH.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2006
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 293238
Other: P7277
DOI: 10.1162/jocn.2006.18.11.1924
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Title: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Cambridge, MA : MIT Press Journals
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 18 (11) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1924 - 1936 Identifier: ISSN: 0898-929X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/991042752752726