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  FMRI investigation of cross-modal interactions in rhythm perception: Audition primes vision, but not vice versa

Grahn, J., Henry, M., & McAuley, J. D. (2011). FMRI investigation of cross-modal interactions in rhythm perception: Audition primes vision, but not vice versa. NeuroImage, 54(2), 1231-1243. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.09.033.

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 Creators:
Grahn, Jessica1, Author
Henry, Molly2, Author           
McAuley, J. Devin3, Author
Affiliations:
1MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Psychology, Bowling Green State University, OH, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Timing; Temporal processing; Rhythm perception; Cross-modal processing; fMRI; Auditory perception; Visual perception
 Abstract: How we measure time and integrate temporal cues from different sensory modalities are fundamental questions in neuroscience. Sensitivity to a “beat” (such as that routinely perceived in music) differs substantially between auditory and visual modalities. Here we examined beat sensitivity in each modality, and examined cross-modal influences, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to characterize brain activity during perception of auditory and visual rhythms. In separate fMRI sessions, participants listened to auditory sequences or watched visual sequences. The order of auditory and visual sequence presentation was counterbalanced so that cross-modal order effects could be investigated. Participants judged whether sequences were speeding up or slowing down, and the pattern of tempo judgments was used to derive a measure of sensitivity to an implied beat. As expected, participants were less sensitive to an implied beat in visual sequences than in auditory sequences. However, visual sequences produced a stronger sense of beat when preceded by auditory sequences with identical temporal structure. Moreover, increases in brain activity were observed in the bilateral putamen for visual sequences preceded by auditory sequences when compared to visual sequences without prior auditory exposure. No such order-dependent differences (behavioral or neural) were found for the auditory sequences. The results provide further evidence for the role of the basal ganglia in internal generation of the beat and suggest that an internal auditory rhythm representation may be activated during visual rhythm perception.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2010-09-192011-01-15
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: eDoc: 537846
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.09.033
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 54 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1231 - 1243 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166