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  Genetic and neural dissociation of individual responses to emotional expressions in human infants

Grossmann, T., Johnson, M. H., Vaish, A., Hughes, D. A., Quinque, D., Stoneking, M., et al. (2011). Genetic and neural dissociation of individual responses to emotional expressions in human infants. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 1(1), 57-66. doi:10.1016/j.dcn.2010.07.001.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-289B-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-FF8F-4
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Grossmann, Tobias1, 2, Author              
Johnson, Mark H.1, Author
Vaish, Arnrisha3, Author
Hughes, D. A.4, Author
Quinque, D.4, Author
Stoneking, M.4, Author
Friederici, Angela D.2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck, University of London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634551              
3Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Emotion; Face; ERP; Individual differences; Infancy; Genetics
 Abstract: Interacting with others by interpreting and responding to their facial expressions is an essential and early developing social skill in humans. We examined whether and how variation in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) genes is associated with 7-month-old infants’ electrocortical responses to facial expressions. The results revealed that COMT variants are associated with differences in infants’ brain responses to fearful faces over centro-parietal regions, whereas 5-HTTLPR variants are associated with differences in infants’ brain responses to happy faces over fronto-temporal regions. Further support for differential associations of these gene variants with emotional processing came from our analysis of infant behavioral temperament: variation in COMT was associated with differences in infants’ recovery from distress, whereas variation in 5-HTTLPR was associated with infants’ smiling and laughter. This pattern of findings indicates that, in infancy, these genetic variants influence distinct brain systems involved in the processing of either positive or negative emotions. This has wide reaching implications for our understanding of how genetic variation biases specific brain mechanisms, giving rise to individual differences in emotional sensitivity and temperament.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2010-07-202011-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 538216
DOI: 10.1016/j.dcn.2010.07.001
 Degree: -

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Title: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 1 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 57 - 66 Identifier: ISSN: 1878-9293
CoNE: /journals/resource/1878-9293