English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
 
 
DownloadE-Mail
  Planning not to do something: Does intending not to do something activate associated sensory consequences?

Kühn, S., & Brass, M. (2010). Planning not to do something: Does intending not to do something activate associated sensory consequences? Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 10(4), 454-459. doi:10.3758/CABN.10.4.454.

Item is

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Description:
-
OA-Status:
Green

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Kühn, Simone1, 2, 3, Author           
Brass, Marcel1, Author           
Affiliations:
1University of Ghent, Belgium, ou_persistent22              
2Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
3Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Department of Experimental Psychology and Ghent Institute for Functional and Metabolic Imaging, Ghent, Belgium, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Acoustic Stimulation; Adult; Analysis of Variance; Auditory Perception; Brain Mapping; Cerebral Cortex; Choice Behavior; Cues; Female; Functional Laterality; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Intention; Learning; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Neuropsychological Tests; Oxygen; Reaction Time; Young Adult
 Abstract: The present fMRI study investigated the central assumptions of ideomotor theory that actions become associated with their sensory consequences. Furthermore, we tested whether sensory effects can also become associated with the voluntary omission of an action. In a training phase, participants had to decide between executing an action and not executing it. Both decisions were followed by a specific effect tone. In the test phase, the participants had to carry out actions without hearing the effect tone. They either had to decide whether to execute an action or not or were instructed to execute an action or not. Our results reveal an increased activity in the auditory cortex elicited by responses that formerly elicited a tone-namely, self-chosen actions and selfchosen nonactions. Moreover, we found binding effects for stimulus-cued actions, but not for stimulus-cued nonactions. These findings support ideomotor theory by showing that a link exists between actions and their effects. Furthermore, our data demonstrate on a neural level that effect tones can become associated with intentionally not acting, therewith supporting the idea of a binding between the voluntary omission of an action and its effects in the environment. © 2010 The Psychonomic Society, Inc.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2009-09-122010-07-112010-12
 Publication Status: Issued
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: ISI: 000285439000003
DOI: 10.3758/CABN.10.4.454
PMID: 21098806
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show hide
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : University of Ghent
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : Postdoctoral Fellowship
Funding organization : Research Foundation Flanders (FWO)

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Austin, TX : Psychonomic Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 454 - 459 Identifier: ISSN: 1530-7026
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1530-7026