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  Dissociable neural imprints of perception and grammar in auditory functional imaging

Herrmann, B., Obleser, J., Kalberlah, C., Haynes, J.-D., & Friederici, A. D. (2012). Dissociable neural imprints of perception and grammar in auditory functional imaging. Human Brain Mapping, 33(3), 584-595. doi:10.1002/hbm.21235.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-5220-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-CD45-9
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Herrmann, Björn1, Author              
Obleser, Jonas2, 3, Author              
Kalberlah, Christian4, 5, 6, Author              
Haynes, John-Dylan4, 6, 7, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.2, 7, Author              
Affiliations:
1Methods and Development Unit MEG and EEG: Signal Analysis and Modelling , MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634559              
2Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
3Max Planck Research Group Auditory Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_751545              
4Max Planck Fellow Research Group Attention and Awareness, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634553              
5Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634549              
6Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
7Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: fMRI; Language comprehension; Linear support vector machine classifier; Multivariate pattern classification; Perceptual processing; Syntactic processing
 Abstract: In language processing, the relative contribution of early sensory and higher cognitive brain areas is still an open issue. A recent controversial hypothesis proposes that sensory cortices show sensitivity to syntactic processes, whereas other studies suggest a wider neural network outside sensory regions. The goal of the current event-related fMRI study is to clarify the contribution of sensory cortices in auditory syntactic processing in a 2 × 2 design. Two-word utterances were presented auditorily and varied both in perceptual markedness (presence or absence of an overt word category marking “-t”), and in grammaticality (syntactically correct or incorrect). A multivariate pattern classification approach was applied to the data, flanked by conventional cognitive subtraction analyses. The combination of methods and the 2 × 2 design revealed a clear picture: The cognitive subtraction analysis found initial syntactic processing signatures in a neural network including the left IFG, the left aSTG, the left superior temporal sulcus (STS), as well as the right STS/STG. Classification of local multivariate patterns indicated the left-hemispheric regions in IFG, aSTG, and STS to be more syntax-specific than the right-hemispheric regions. Importantly, auditory sensory cortices were only sensitive to the overt perceptual marking, but not to the grammaticality, speaking against syntax-inflicted sensory cortex modulations. Instead, our data provide clear evidence for a distinction between regions involved in pure perceptual processes and regions involved in initial syntactic processes.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2010-11-182011-03-092012-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/hbm.21235
PMID: 21391281
Other: Epub 2011
 Degree: -

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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 33 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 584 - 595 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925601686