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  The impact of iconic gestures on foreign language word learning and its neural substrate

Macedonia, M., Müller, K., & Friederici, A. D. (2011). The impact of iconic gestures on foreign language word learning and its neural substrate. Human Brain Mapping, 32(6), 982-998. doi:10.1002/hbm.21084.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-530A-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-FFB1-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Macedonia, Manuela1, Author              
Müller, Karsten2, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634558              

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Free keywords: Gestures; Foreign language learning; Memory; Premotor cortex; Cognitive control; Vocabulary acquisition
 Abstract: Vocabulary acquisition represents a major challenge in foreign language learning. Research has demonstrated that gestures accompanying speech have an impact on memory for verbal information in the speakers' mother tongue and, as recently shown, also in foreign language learning. However, the neural basis of this effect remains unclear. In a within-subjects design, we compared learning of novel words coupled with iconic and meaningless gestures. Iconic gestures helped learners to significantly better retain the verbal material over time. After the training, participants' brain activity was registered by means of fMRI while performing a word recognition task. Brain activations to words learned with iconic and with meaningless gestures were contrasted. We found activity in the premotor cortices for words encoded with iconic gestures. In contrast, words encoded with meaningless gestures elicited a network associated with cognitive control. These findings suggest that memory performance for newly learned words is not driven by the motor component as such, but by the motor image that matches an underlying representation of the word's semantics.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 20102011-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 562469
Other: P11599
DOI: 10.1002/hbm.21084
 Degree: -

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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 32 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 982 - 998 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925601686