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  Predicting others' actions: Evidence for a constant time delay in action simulation

Sparenberg, P., Springer, A., & Prinz, W. (2012). Predicting others' actions: Evidence for a constant time delay in action simulation. Psychological Research, 76(1), 41-49. doi:10.1007/s00426-011-0321-z.

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 Creators:
Sparenberg, Peggy1, Author              
Springer, Anne1, Author              
Prinz, Wolfgang1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              

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 Abstract: Recent evidence indicates that humans can precisely predict the outcome of occluded actions. It has been suggested that these predictions arise from a mental simulation which might run in real-time. The present experiments aimed to specify the time course of this simulation process. Participants watched transiently occluded point-light actions and the temporal outcome after occlusion was manipulated. Participants were instructed to judge the temporal coherence of the action after a short (Experiment 1) and a long occlusion period (Experiment 2). Both experiments revealed a comparable negative point of subjective equality (PSE), indicating that action simulation took constantly longer than the observed action itself. Such a temporal error was not present when inverted actions were used, (Experiment 3) ruling out a pure visually driven effect. The results suggest that the temporal error is due to costs arising from a switch from action perception to an internal simulation process involving motor representations.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 20102011-03-022012-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 562514
Other: P11465
DOI: 10.1007/s00426-011-0321-z
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Title: Psychological Research
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Berlin : Springer-Verlag
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 76 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 41 - 49 Identifier: ISSN: 0340-0727
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925518603_1