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  What is shared in joint action? Issues of co-representation, response conflict, and agent identification

Wenke, D., Atmaca, S., Holländer, A., Liepelt, R., Baess, P., & Prinz, W. (2011). What is shared in joint action? Issues of co-representation, response conflict, and agent identification. Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 2(2), 147-172. doi:10.1007/s13164-011-0057-0.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-F068-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-C5B5-E
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Wenke, Dorit1, 2, Author              
Atmaca, Silke1, Author              
Holländer, Antje1, Author              
Liepelt, Roman1, 3, Author              
Baess, Pamela1, 4, Author              
Prinz, Wolfgang1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Junior Group “Neurocognition of Joint Action”, Department of Psychology, Münster University, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Brain Research Unit, School of Science, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: When sharing a task with another person that requires turn taking, as in doubles games of table tennis, performance on the shared task is similar to performing the whole task alone. This has been taken to indicate that humans co-represent their partner’s task share, as if it were their own. Task co-representation allows prediction of the other’s responses when it is the other’s turn, and leads to response conflict in joint interference tasks. However, data from our lab cast doubt on the view that task co-representation and resulting response conflict are the only or even primary source of effects observed in task sharing. Recent findings furthermore suggest another potential source of interference in joint task performance that has been neglected so far: Self-other discrimination and conflict related to agent identification (i.e., determining whether it is “my” or the other’s turn). Based on these findings we propose that participants might not always co-represent what their partner is supposed to do, but instead co-represent that another agent is responsible for part of the task, and when it is his turn. We call this account the actor co-representation account.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-05-192011-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s13164-011-0057-0
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Title: Review of Philosophy and Psychology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Dordrecht : Springer
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 2 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 147 - 172 Identifier: ISSN: 1878-5158
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1878-5158