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  Hard and fast rules about the body: Contributions of the action stream to judging body space

Hach, S., Ishihara, M., Keller, P. E., & Schütz-Bosbach, S. (2011). Hard and fast rules about the body: Contributions of the action stream to judging body space. Experimental Brain Research, 212(4), 563-574. doi:10.1007/s00221-011-2765-1.

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 Creators:
Hach, Sylvia1, Author              
Ishihara, Masami2, Author
Keller, Peter E.3, Author              
Schütz-Bosbach, Simone1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Body and Self, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634554              
2Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan, ou_persistent22              
3Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              

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Free keywords: Action-perception; Left–right handedness; Lateralisation; Personal space; Body representation; Somatosensation
 Abstract: Analogously to the visual system, somatosensory processing may be segregated into two streams, with the body constituting either part of the action system or a perceptual object. Experimental studies with participants free from neurological disease which test this hypothesis are rare, however. The present study explored the contributions of the two putative streams to a task that requires participants to estimate the spatial properties of their own body. Two manipulations from the visuospatial literature were included. First, participants were required to point either backward towards pre-defined landmarks on their own body (egocentric reference frame) or to a forward projection of their own body (allocentric representation). Second, a manipulation of movement mode was included, requiring participants to perform pointing movements either immediately, or after a fixed delay, following instruction. Results show that accessing an allocentric representation of one’s own body results in performance changes. Specifically, the spatial bias shown to exist for body space when pointing backward at one’s own body disappears when participants are requested to mentally project their body to a pre-defined location in front space. Conversely, delayed execution of pointing movements does not result in performance changes. Altogether, these findings provide support for a constrained dual stream hypothesis of somatosensory processing and are the first to show similarities in the processing of body space and peripersonal space.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-06-192011-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00221-011-2765-1
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Title: Experimental Brain Research
  Other : Exp. Brain Res.
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 212 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 563 - 574 Identifier: ISSN: 0014-4819
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925398496