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  How two share two tasks: Evidence of a social psychological refractory period effect

Liepelt, R., & Prinz, W. (2011). How two share two tasks: Evidence of a social psychological refractory period effect. Experimental Brain Research, 211(3-4), 387-396. doi:10.1007/s00221-011-2703-2.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-F3C4-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-C646-2
Genre: Journal Article

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Liepelt and Prinz_2011.pdf (Publisher version), 348KB
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 Creators:
Liepelt, Roman1, 2, Author              
Prinz, Wolfgang1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2Junior Group “Neurocognition of Joint Action”, Department of Psychology, Münster University, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Joint action; Social PRP; Dual task
 Abstract: A strong assumption shared by major theoretical approaches to cognition posits that the human cognitive system has a limited capacity for information processing. Evidence supporting this claim comes from the dual-task paradigm in which one cognitive system has to process two tasks simultaneously. In this study, we examined whether bottleneck-like processing can also be elicited when a dual task is shared between two individuals. Under dual-task instructions giving priority to Task 1, we found evidence of a psychological refractory period effect in dual-task and joint-task conditions. Under equal priority instructions, we replicated the finding of a psychological refractory period effect in the dual-task, but not in the joint-task condition. These findings are in line with the assumption that a social psychological refractory period effect can be induced across two individuals. We suggest that this effect is due to task-specific monitoring requirements. We discuss our findings with respect to both dual-task and joint action theories.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-05-052011-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00221-011-2703-2
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Title: Experimental Brain Research
  Other : Exp. Brain Res.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Heidelberg : Springer-Verlag
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 211 (3-4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 387 - 396 Identifier: ISSN: 0014-4819
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925398496