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  18-month-olds learn novel words through overhearing

Gampe, A., Liebal, K., & Tomasello, M. (2012). 18-month-olds learn novel words through overhearing. First Language, 32(3), 385-397. doi:10.1177/0142723711433584.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-03CF-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-9D7B-4
Genre: Journal Article
Alternative Title : Eighteen-month-olds learn novel words through overhearing

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 Creators:
Gampe, Anja1, 2, Author              
Liebal, Kristin2, 3, Author
Tomasello, Michael2, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_persistent22              
3University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: joint attention, overhearing, word learning
 Abstract: The prototypical word learning situation in western, middle-class cultures is dyadic: an adult addresses a child directly, ideally in a manner sensitive to their current focus of attention. But young children also seem to learn many of their words in polyadic situations through overhearing. Extending the previous work of Akhtar and colleagues, in the current two studies we gave 18-month-old infants opportunities to acquire novel words through overhearing in situations that were a bit more complex: they did not socially interact with the adult who used the new word before the word learning situation began, and the way the adult used the new word was less transparent in that it was neither a naming nor a directive speech act. In both studies, infants learned words equally well (and above chance) whether they were directly addressed or had to eavesdrop on two adults. Almost from the beginning, young children employ diverse learning strategies for acquiring new words.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-01-222012-02-282012-08-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/0142723711433584
 Degree: -

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Title: First Language
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 32 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 385 - 397 Identifier: ISSN: 0142-7237
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/110978977559011