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Journal Article

The self in social interactions: Sensory attenuation of auditory action effects is stronger in interactions with others

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Weiss,  Carmen
Max Planck Research Group Body and Self, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Schütz-Bosbach,  Simone
Max Planck Research Group Body and Self, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Weiss_TheSelf.pdf
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Citation

Weiss, C., Herwig, A., & Schütz-Bosbach, S. (2011). The self in social interactions: Sensory attenuation of auditory action effects is stronger in interactions with others. PLoS One, 6(7): e22723. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0022723.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-0EA2-9
Abstract
The experience of oneself as an agent not only results from interactions with the inanimate environment, but often takes place in a social context. Interactions with other people have been suggested to play a key role in the construal of selfagency. Here, we investigated the influence of social interactions on sensory attenuation of action effects as a marker of prereflective self-agency. To this end, we compared the attenuation of the perceived loudness intensity of auditory action effects generated either by oneself or another person in either an individual, non-interactive or interactive action context. In line with previous research, the perceived loudness of self-generated sounds was attenuated compared to sounds generated by another person. Most importantly, this effect was strongly modulated by social interactions between self and other. Sensory attenuation of self- and other-generated sounds was increased in interactive as compared to the respective individual action contexts. This is the first experimental evidence suggesting that pre-reflective self-agency can extend to and is shaped by interactions between individuals.