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Musicians' minds as a model: training effects of musical expertise, brain plasticity and clues to evolutionary development

MPG-Autoren
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Fairhurst,  Merle T.
Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Uhlig,  Marie
Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Keller,  Peter E.
Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Fairhurst, M. T., Uhlig, M., & Keller, P. E. (2011). Musicians' minds as a model: training effects of musical expertise, brain plasticity and clues to evolutionary development. Bachelor studies in Music Theory. University of Leipzig, Germany, 2011-04-05 - 2011-07-12.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-1393-2
Zusammenfassung
Music is an intrinsic part of our everyday life as well as our evolutionary development. Listening to and performing music not only alters our mood but, it seems, also alters how our brains function. These experience-related changes can result in improved musical performance at the most basic behavioral level to heightened social cohesion. A better understanding of how we hear and process music and how this in turn results in brain changes can be used to develop treatments for both music specific (focal dystonia) and unrelated (aphasia) pathologies. During the course of the seminar program, experimental studies as well as informative reviews will be studied and discussed covering the following topics: 1. How we hear 2. How the musician's brain is different 3. Music as a model for brain plasticity 4. Music as medicine 5. Music and development 6. Music making in groups The seminar will be conducted by members of the "Music Cognition and Action" group (Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences). It is open for all interested students. The seminar will be partially in English and German.