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Misexpression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor ICK1/KRP1 in single-celled Arabidopsis trichomes reduces endoreduplication and cell size and induces cell death

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Schnittger,  A.
Other Publications, MPI for Plant Breeding Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Schnittger, A., Weinl, C., Bouyer, D., Schobinger, U., & Huelskamp, M. (2003). Misexpression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor ICK1/KRP1 in single-celled Arabidopsis trichomes reduces endoreduplication and cell size and induces cell death. Plant Cell, 15(2), 303-315.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-3D08-7
Abstract
A positive correlation between cell size and DNA content has been recognized in many plant cell types. Conversely, misexpression of a dominant-negative cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) or CDK inhibitor proteins (ICK/KRPs) in Arabidopsis and tobacco leaves has revealed that cell growth can be uncoupled from cell cycle progression and DNA content. However, cell growth also appears to be controlled in a non-cell-autonomous manner by organ size, making it difficult in a ubiquitous expression assay to judge the cell-autonomous function of putative cell growth regulators. Here, we investigated the function of the CDK inhibitor ICK1/KRP1 on cell growth and differentiation independent of any compensatory influence of an organ context using Arabidopsis trichomes as a model system. By analyzing cell size with respect to DNA content, we dissected cell growth in a DNA-dependent and a DNA-independent process. We further found that ICK1/KRP1 misexpression interfered with differentiation and induced cell death, linking cell cycle progression, differentiation, and cell death in plants. The function of ICK1/KRP1 in planta was found to be dependent on a C-terminal domain and regulated negatively by an N-terminal domain. Finally, we identified CDKA;1 and a D-type cyclin as possible targets of ICK1/KRP1 expression in vivo.