English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Contribution to Collected Edition

The Amsterdam Treaty: The Blueprint for the Future Institutional Balance?

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons41171

Falkner,  Gerda
Problemlösungsfähigkeit der Mehrebenenpolitik in Europa, MPI for the Study of Societies, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons41263

Nentwich,  Michael
Projekte von Gastwissenschaftlern und Postdoc-Stipendiaten, MPI for the Study of Societies, Max Planck Society;
Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Institut für Technikfolgen-Abschätzung, Wien;

Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Falkner, G., & Nentwich, M. (2000). The Amsterdam Treaty: The Blueprint for the Future Institutional Balance? In K. Neunreither, & A. Wiener (Eds.), European Integration after Amsterdam: Institutional Dynamics and Prospects for Democracy (pp. 15-35). Oxford: Oxford University Press.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-55DA-D
Abstract
The 1996‐97 intergovernmental conference (IGC) aimed, inter alia, at solving the most pressing institutional issues in order to prepare the ground for the next wave of enlargement. The paper first contrasts this IGC's mandate with the outcome of the Amsterdam Treaty. It then analyses the four most significant reform steps with a view to democratic governance at the EU level: they concern the issue of ‘appropriate representation’ in the European Parliament; the appointment of the Commission President; the latter's powers concerning the internal organization of the Commission; and, finally, the new powers and competences of the EP. The authors conclude that the incremental institutional changes during the two decades since the first direct European elections amounted to a fundamental reform and that, in the future, this new inter‐institutional balance would be refined rather than fundamentally challenged.