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Conference Paper

A Time Machine for Text Search

MPS-Authors
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Berberich,  Klaus
Databases and Information Systems, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

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Bedathur,  Srikanta
Databases and Information Systems, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

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Neumann,  Thomas
Databases and Information Systems, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

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Weikum,  Gerhard
Databases and Information Systems, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Berberich, K., Bedathur, S., Neumann, T., & Weikum, G. (2007). A Time Machine for Text Search. In C. Clarke, N. Fuhr, N. Kando, W. Kraaij, & A. P. de Vries (Eds.), SIGIR'07: 30th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval (pp. 519-526). New York, NY, USA: ACM.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-1E4C-8
Abstract
Text search over temporally versioned document collections such as web archives has received little attention as a research problem. As a consequence, there is no scalable and principled solution to search such a collection as of a specified time. In this work, we address this shortcoming and propose an efficient solution for time-travel text search by extending the inverted file index to make it ready for temporal search. We introduce approximate temporal coalescing as a tunable method to reduce the index size without significantly affecting the quality of results. In order to further improve the performance of time-travel queries, we introduce two principled techniques to trade off index size for its performance. These techniques can be formulated as optimization problems that can be solved to near-optimality. Finally, our approach is evaluated in a comprehensive series of experiments on two large-scale real-world datasets. Results unequivocally show that our methods make it possible to build an efficient "time machine" scalable to large versioned text collections.