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Pyrolysis in the mesophase: A chemist's approach toward preparing carbon nano- and microparticles

MPS-Authors
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Gherghel,  L.
MPI for Polymer Research, Max Planck Society;

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Lieser,  Günter
MPI for Polymer Research, Max Planck Society;

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Räder,  Hans Joachim
MPI for Polymer Research, Max Planck Society;

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Müllen,  Klaus
MPI for Polymer Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Gherghel, L., Kübel, C., Lieser, G., Räder, H. J., & Müllen, K. (2002). Pyrolysis in the mesophase: A chemist's approach toward preparing carbon nano- and microparticles. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 124(44), 13130-13138. doi:10.1021/ja020363u.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-64A4-5
Abstract
A mild pyrolytic method is proposed for the generation of different carbon micro- and nanoparticles that are either unprecedented or have never been reported under the present experimental conditions. A hexa-alkyl-substituted hexa-peri- hexabenzocoronene serves as a graphite-like starting compound that melts into a discotic liquid crystalline phase prior to heat-induced cross-linking and dehydrogenation. An essential feature of the process is that the liquid crystalline order persists even above 400 degreesC, i.e., during alkyl chain cleavage. The present approach bears a resemblance to carbomesophase formation during graphitization starting from pitch. The pyrolysis products are characterized by matrix- assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, optical microscopy, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).