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Journal Article

Late motor decline after accomplished remyelination: Impact for progressive multiple sclerosis.

MPS-Authors
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Urlaub,  H.
Research Group of Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

1448763.pdf
(Publisher version), 4MB

Supplementary Material (public)

1448763_Supplement_1.pdf
(Supplementary material), 74KB

1448763_Supplement_2.pdf
(Supplementary material), 274KB

Citation

Manrique-Hoyos, N., Jürgens, T., Gronborg, M., Kreutzfeld, M., Schedensack, M., Kuhlmann, T., et al. (2012). Late motor decline after accomplished remyelination: Impact for progressive multiple sclerosis. Annals of Neurology, 71(2), 227-244. doi:10.1002/ana.22681.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-83C0-F
Abstract
M ultiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common disabling neurological disease in young adults (reviewed in Friese and colleagues, 1 Trapp and colleagues, 2 and Nose- worthy and colleagues 3 ). Disability often becomes apparent as a result of repeated attacks, followed by par- tial or complete remission of neurological symptoms (relapsing-remitting MS [RRMS]), which in turn is fol- lowed by a phase of gradually worsening clinical symp- toms (secondary progressive MS [SPMS]). Moreover, some MS patients show a steady neurological decline even in the absence of acute attacks (primary progressive MS [PPMS]).