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The specificity of herbivore-induced plant volatiles in attracting herbivore enemies

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Clavijo McCormick,  Andrea Liliana
Research Group Dr. S. Unsicker, Chemical Ecology of Trees, Department of Biochemistry, Prof. J. Gershenzon, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;
IMPRS on Ecological Interactions, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Unsicker,  Sybille
Research Group Dr. S. Unsicker, Chemical Ecology of Trees, Department of Biochemistry, Prof. J. Gershenzon, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Gershenzon,  Jonathan
Department of Biochemistry, Prof. J. Gershenzon, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Clavijo McCormick, A. L., Unsicker, S., & Gershenzon, J. (2012). The specificity of herbivore-induced plant volatiles in attracting herbivore enemies. Trends in Plant Science, 17(5), 303-310. doi:10.1016/j.tplants.2012.03.012.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-84E0-0
Abstract
Plants respond to herbivore attack by emitting complex mixtures of volatile compounds that attract herbivore enemies, both predators and parasitoids. Here, we explore whether these mixtures provide significant value as information cues in herbivore enemy attraction. Our survey indicates that blends of volatiles released from damaged plants are frequently specific depending on the type of herbivore and its age, abundance and feeding guild. The sensory perception of plant volatiles by herbivore enemies is also specific, according to the latest evidence from studies of insect olfaction. Thus, enemies do exploit the detailed information provided by plant volatile mixtures in searching for their prey or hosts, but this varies with the diet breadth of the enemy.