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In vitro transition of Schistocephalus solidus (Cestoda) from coracidium to procercoid and from procercoid to plerocercoid

MPS-Authors
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Jakobsen,  P. J.
Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Scharsack,  J. P.
Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Hammerschmidt,  K.
Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Deines,  P.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Kalbe,  M.
Research Group Parasitology, Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Milinski,  M.
Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Jakobsen, P. J., Scharsack, J. P., Hammerschmidt, K., Deines, P., Kalbe, M., & Milinski, M. (2012). In vitro transition of Schistocephalus solidus (Cestoda) from coracidium to procercoid and from procercoid to plerocercoid. Experimental Parasitology, 130(3), 267-273. doi:10.1016/j.exppara.2011.09.009.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D32A-6
Abstract
With the present study, a culture system for successive life-cycle stages of the tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus was developed and this report documents for the first time, cultivation of the procercoid stage of S. solidus from eggs. Additionally we have transformed procercoids dissected from experimentally infected copepods and cultured procercoids into the early plerocercoid stage in vitro. Observations in the culture suggest that the coracidia can interact with their external environment and need no host specific stimuli, except for the components in the culture medium, for activation and hatching from the embryophore. Increasing the culture medium pH from 7.3 to 8.0 improved escape rates and frequencies of hook contractions, suggesting that the oncosphere may recognize and respond to environmental conditions along the host intestine. Procercoids in the culture did not stop growing indicating that conditions within the copepod may be important to limit growth and to induce transformation to plerocercoids. When procercoids are dissected from copepods and transferred to the culture, the outer tegument layers and cercomer starts to loosen. Comparison of the lectin staining of the loosened outer tegument layers and cercomer in procercoids dissected from copepods confirms that transitions of both, the oncosphere to procercoid and procercoid to plerocercoids, has taken place in the in vitro cultures.