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Small effective population sizes in two planktonic freshwater copepod species (Eudiaptomus) with apparently large census sizes

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Zeller,  M.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Reusch,  T. B. H.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;
Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Lampert,  W.
Emeritus Group Lampert, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Zeller, M., Reusch, T. B. H., & Lampert, W. (2008). Small effective population sizes in two planktonic freshwater copepod species (Eudiaptomus) with apparently large census sizes. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 21(6), 1755-1762. doi:10.1111/j.1420-9101.2008.01589.x.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D64D-6
Abstract
In small planktonic organisms, large census sizes (N-c) suggest large effective population sizes (N-e), but reliable estimates are rare. Here, we present N-e/N-c ratios for two freshwater copepod species (Eudiaptomus sp.) using temporal samples of multilocus microsatellite genotypes and a pseudo-likelihood approach. N-e/N-c ratios were very small in both Eudiaptomus species (10(-7)-10(-8)). Although we hypothesized that the species producing resting eggs (E. graciloides) had a larger N-e than the other (E. gracilis), estimates were not statistically different (E. graciloides: N-e = 672.7, CI: 276-1949; E. gracilis: N-e = 1027.4, CI: 449-2495), suggesting that the propagule bank of E. graciloides had no detectable influence on N-e.