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Predator-mediated genotypic shifts in a prey population: experimental evidence

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Pijanowska,  Joanna
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Weider,  Lawrence J.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Lampert,  Winfried
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Pijanowska, J., Weider, L. J., & Lampert, W. (1993). Predator-mediated genotypic shifts in a prey population: experimental evidence. Oecologia, 96(1), 40-42.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-E3D9-1
Abstract
We demonstrate the effect of fish predation on genotype frequencies in a laboratory population composed of two Daphnia magna clones, with historically contrasting exposures to fish predation. The two clones differed in their responsiveness to predation via differential avoidance/escape behavior. The clone which coexists with fish in nature is more responsive to the presence of a fish predator, while the clone not exposed to fish predation does not exhibit the defensive reaction. Fish caused a rapid (within 18 h) and significant shift in Daphnia clonal composition, from 1:1 to 8:1, in favor of the responsive clone. Genotype-specific defensive abilities (modus defendi) can contribute greatly to the phenomenon of genotype replacement under selective predation.